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Based on my posts on The Honest Sorcerer, one might consider me a pessimist — someone who sees only the risks and pitfalls ahead and expects the worst to come. To some extent this is true. What makes me ponder though is this: what is a more appropriate approach in our time? Evolutionary, you have a better chance for survival if you look for risks and expect the worst outcomes when things go south, rather than hoping that everything will just turn out fine and hit the wall head first. On the other hand, you gain much more if you…

“Anyone who believes exponential growth can go on forever in a finite world is either a madman or an economist”

Kenneth E. Boulding

Last week we have discussed the systemic background of the great unraveling. After staring deep into the eye of evanescence working slowly but steadily to put our civilization to rest, I would like to share some insights into the economic and political ramifications of the coming net energy crunch. Before we begin: let me state it clearly, I do not wish to take any political side in this. I sincerely believe that 99.9999% of our leaders (both…

Last week I published a completely retrospective post about finding acceptance. I hope it managed to show that there is light at the end of the tunnel we all go or went through while contemplating on the limited lifetime of civilizations. This is hard to process — I know. Take your time and never loose hope: after finding answers to the most important questions (those that you ask yourself), you will also find peace and serenity. Never give up looking for those answers.

If you feel ready, let’s continue with uncovering the untold stories behind the last stages of a…

Writing about the inner workings of our world and starting to understand it as a complex whole with fully interrelated parts comes with certain implications. Recently I’ve arrived at some conclusions and I would like to separate them from my regular posts. I wanted to leave some room for you to contemplate on these topics before I offload my interpretation of our situation on you.

What you can read here in the editorial columns of the Honest Sorcerer serves as an outlet valve for the many thoughts that have arisen in me while I was writing this blog. Take them…

Last week we have explored the basics of complex adaptive systems. Now let’s take a look under the hood and find out what role(s) energy has to play in such a system and see what are the options for adoption in light of the changes ahead.

What is energy?

In my previous post I’ve showed you how complex systems form themselves around the use of energy — but what it is actually? It is very hard to define, in fact it is better understood through the forms it takes: it is the heat and light from the sun, the power generated by our…

All models are wrong, but some are useful

— George E. P. Box

I’ve started this blog by exploring our species past, present and possible future based on resource consumption. I’ve laid out the map and made an attempt at uncovering some of our folly that led us to this state threatening humanity with a very thin bottleneck in the not so distant future. …

Modern thinking in western societies revolves around choices and individual responsibility. You are supposed to choose the right product from the supermarket shelf. The right spouse. A right circle of friends. A right carrier path. The right candidate on an election. The right cause to fight for. It all depends on you — you should know the consequences of these (and many more) choices and decide rationally.

This is exactly what modern economic thinking founded by Adam Smith teaches us about rationality. You should weigh the costs and benefits and make a decision. If you are a responsible person then…

I admit that Part 1 of True Sustainability was a little grim. When I was writing about copper I myself had to realize it too that we really don’t have much time left. We have to be honest though — at least to ourselves — in order to leave the past of industrial scale destruction behind and start imagining a better future. With that said I encourage you the read Part 1 to have a solid understanding of the basics if you haven’t done so already. …

I have finished my previous post with a quote from Aristotle. It highlights the importance of contemplation (seriously thinking about where our actions lead). It is especially important in our age: our civilization is at an inflection point. As I have sketched out the last time things are about to change and not for the better. I have started with drawing a map of our resource problem placed in semi sci-fi context. My aim was to push out the boundaries of conventional wisdom and to make the unimaginable imaginable (if you haven’t read it so far, please read it now).

Your perspective of time defines how do you think about events in the past, the present and the future. It helps you build a story in which you place yourself as a protagonist and gives you a map to your future. It matters more than you think.

So, what is your perspective of time? Is it an upward arrow from the stone age to Star Trek? Or maybe it is interrupted by small setbacks…? Education systems all around the world teach this version of history and thus provide us a common ground to think about the shape of time. They…

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A critique of modern times - offering ideas for honest contemplation.

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